Economic Security

mom and babyStrong communities, healthy families, and a thriving economy that benefits us all: That is the future we want for Washington state. Yet far too many residents are struggling to put food on the table and afford a roof over their heads, much less to save for the future. Economic progress for our state means that everyone can share in a growing state economy. 

Our state must provide people with the foundations they need to gain economic security. To do that, it must protect investments in programs that are critical to so many families with middle and low incomes, like the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Working Connections Child Care, mental health services, housing assistance, and job training programs. When Washingtonians have access to programs that strengthen their ability to provide for themselves and their families, this can lead to improved long-term outcomes for families, communities, and the economy.

Highlights:


Related Research:

General Assistance: New Strategies for a Vital Program

February 11, 2009 - Today the Budget and Policy Center is releasing a new policy brief on Washington’s General Assistance Program, which provides financial and medical assistance to over 20,000 adults with disabilities in the state.

High Interest, Lost Opportunity: Mapping the cost of payday lending in Washington State

January 31, 2007 - Basic financial services available to lower income families such as cashing checks and short-term loans often come with interest rates that soar well above 300 percent.

State could do more to support struggling families: Benefit levels have not kept up with the cost of living

January 2007 - The monthly WorkFirst cash assistance benefit is a key part of the state’s social safety net, but it has not been increased since 1993.

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF): New federal welfare requirements pose tough choices for Washington

February, 2006 - The budget agreement makes the most significant changes to the TANF program since it was enacted in 1996 – effectively ending years of debate regarding the program’s reauthorization.

How the 2006 Federal Budget Agreement matters to Washington State: Impact on low and moderate-income Washingtonians

February, 2006 - This brief describes fiscal and policy changes to other key areas included in the budget agreement.

Gap between rich and poor in Washington - Third fastest growth in Nation: Incomes of Poorest Families Stagnant Over Past Decade

Jan. 26, 2006 - A new report today found Washington State wealthy families have over seven times higher incomes than low-income families.
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HIGHLIGHTS

Policy Summit You're InvitedSign Up and Save the Date!

We will host two Budget Matters policy summits this year – one in Spokane on October 31 (register now) and one in Seattle on December 6 (registration coming soon)! The Spokane summit, featuring Jared Bernstein of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, will focus on the impact of federal and state policy decisions on eastern Washington communities. The Seattle summit, featuring Glenn Harris of Race Forward, will examine what it would take to lift up everyone to advance progress in our state. Find out more.

Our Policy Priorities

Washington state should be a place where all our residents have strong communities, great schools, and the chance for a bright future. Our 2017-2019 Legislative Agenda outlines the priorities we are working to advance to build a better Washington.

Budget Beat!

Check out the Budget Beat webinars we hosted throughout the 2017 legislative session, including our most recent Budget Beat about federal budget proposals, featuring Louisa Warren of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, on our YouTube channel

Testimonies in Olympia

To advance our legislative priorities, the Budget & Policy Center team was in the state capitol throughout session testifying on a wide range of bills. Watch our testimonies on TVW:
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