Schmudget Blog


KIDS COUNT Report: Washington Continues to See Historic Progress in Kids’ Health Care Access

Posted by Jennifer Tran at Jun 13, 2017 09:25 AM |

The number of Washington state children with health insurance has risen to historic highs, with 39 of every 40 kids in the state now covered by health insurance. Further, disparities in access to health care have been reduced across nearly all racial and ethnic groups. This according to the 2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book released by the Annie E. Casey Foundation and the KIDS COUNT Data Center. Given this monumental progress toward strengthening the long-term health and well-being of Washington’s kids, our representatives in Washington, D.C. must reject harmful federal policy proposals that would send kids’ health backward.

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Washington state's Cover All Kids law, passed in 2007, combined with the 2014 implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) have helped reduce the number of uninsured Washington children by more than half, to 3 percent today from 6 percent in 2011. This improvement underscores how smart federal investments to expand Washington state’s Apple Health for Kids has significantly enabled more kids to see a doctor or get necessary medicines when they’re sick.

As the chart below shows, these policies have also advanced health equity by connecting more Black, Latino, and Asian and Pacific Islander (API) children with the coverage they need to thrive. Today, only 2 percent of Black and API and 3 percent of Latino children are without health insurance. With the exception of American Indian children, coverage gaps among children of different races and ethnicities have narrowed since 2011. Ten percent of American Indian kids remain uninsured in Washington state.

[Click on image to enlarge.]

Uninsurance rates by race/ethnicity updated 12June2017

Unfortunately, this progress toward covering more kids is threatened by federal policy proposals that would make huge cuts to health care for people with low incomes. The proposal to “repeal and replace” the ACA with the American Health Care Act passed the U.S. House of Representatives and is now being negotiated by the U.S. Senate. It would effectively end the Medicaid expansion that led so many more children from families with low incomes to get health insurance through Apple Health for Kids in Washington. Furthermore, the president’s proposed budget would also slash Medicaid funding to the state nearly in half by 2027.

We all have a responsibility to ensure all of Washington’s kids have the opportunity to have a healthy start in life. At a time when far too many Washington families are just one personal crisis away from a financial catastrophe, it is vital that families can afford basic preventative health care for their children and can take them to a doctor when they need to. State and federal lawmakers must protect the health and economic security of kids and families against harmful budget proposals. They must safeguard the great progress our state has made in covering more children and closing racial and ethnic gaps in health coverage.

To read more about how Washington’s kids rank nationally in economic well-being, education, health, and family and community, read the full 2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book, the one-page KIDS COUNT Washington state 2017 profile, and our KIDS COUNT in Washington press release.

New Research Brief: Early Learning Improves Kindergarten Readiness and Reduces Disparities for Kids of Color

Posted by Jennifer Tran at Apr 04, 2017 01:00 PM |
Filed under: Kids Count, Education, Equity

We all have a stake in making sure that from the day they’re born, kids can have the enriching experiences they need to get off to a great start in life. Quality early learning can give children the tools they need to thrive academically and emotionally throughout their entire lives. 

This new KIDS COUNT in Washington research brief demonstrates why legislators need to make greater investments in the Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program (ECEAP) – our state’s preschool program that serves children from families living in poverty. Expanding this program to ensure all eligible kids can participate could help more of Washington’s kids show up to kindergarten ready to learn. It could especially help many children of color who haven’t had equal access to opportunities that promote kindergarten readiness.

ECEAP, which serves families with incomes below 110 percent of the federal poverty line ($26,730 for a family of four in 2017), offers many of our state’s most vulnerable children quality early-childhood learning experiences. It has a proven record of improving kindergarten readiness and impacting their long-term academic success. Yet because of inadequate state investments in this program, there are currently about 23,000 unserved children eligible for ECEAP in Washington, 62 percent of whom we estimate are children of color.

KIDS COUNT in Washington, which is a partnership between the Budget & Policy Center and the Children’s Alliance, examined how expanding ECEAP to serve the 23,000 unserved eligible children could impact readiness for kindergarten across the state and help bridge disparities in access to opportunities that promote kindergarten readiness. Our analysis concluded:

  • Kindergarten readiness in Washington overall could increase by 20 percent (to 56 percent from 47 percent);
  • 7,900 more children could be ready for kindergarten on all six indicators of readiness (1) by the end of their year in ECEAP; and
  • The share of Latino, American Indian, and Black children ready for kindergarten could have the largest increases (See chart for more details).

(Click on graphic for enlarged image)

ECEAP K-Readiness

The Washington State Department of Early Learning has set a goal of ensuring that, by 2020, 90 percent of Washington children enter kindergarten prepared to learn, with race and family income no longer a predictor of kindergarten readiness. A key to delivering on that promise is to make sure all eligible children have access to ECEAP. 

See our full research brief for more information on how expanding ECEAP could improve kindergarten readiness for all kids in Washington state and help bridge disparities for kids of color.


For more detailed technical information on our analysis, please contact jennifert@budgetandpolicy.org for a copy of our Data and Methods document.

1. The six indicators of readiness refer to an assessment by educators and teachers to measure kindergarten readiness on six developmental domains: social-emotional, physical, language, cognitive, literacy, and mathematics. See the full brief for more information on how the indicators are measured.

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Budget Beat!

We host regular Budget Beat webinars throughout legislative session to bring you updates and breaking news from Olympia and timely policy analysis. Join us on Friday, June 23, for a Budget Beat about federal budget proposals, featuring Louisa Warren of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. And visit our YouTube channel to watch our previous Budget Beats. 

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View Our School Funding Plenary 

Roxana_BMC_plenary_2016View the Budget Matters 2016 conference plenary, "What's at Stake in the 2017-2019 Budget: Funding McCleary and Beyond." Moderated by Ann Dornfeld of KUOW, the plenary features Nathan Gibbs-Bowling, the 2016 Washington State Teacher of the Year; Lew Moore of the Washington Research Council; Roxana Norouzi of OneAmerica; and Sen. Christine Rolfes. The plenary starts after an intro by Executive Director Misha Werschkul and an intro video by Gov. Inslee.