Schmudget Blog
Showing blog entries tagged as: Equity


Yes on I-1631: An inclusive approach to building healthier communities

Washingtonians must take bold action to confront the serious threat that air pollution poses to the health and well-being of communities from Longview to Walla Walla. But meaningful action can only be achieved and sustained if people and communities – especially people of color, rural communities, and other populations that are often overlooked by lawmakers and initiative campaigns – are rightfully included in developing solutions to this threat from the very beginning.

That's why the Washington State Budget & Policy Center is joining Tribal Nations, businesses, climate scientists, public health experts, and organizations representing communities of color, workers, and families with lower incomes in endorsing Initiative 1631.

I-1631 is a smart, inclusive proposal to invest in clean air and water in Washington state. Under the measure, hundreds of millions of dollars would be invested in communities like Yakima, South Seattle, Centralia, and other areas that have been most harmed by air pollution to build clean and efficient transportation and energy infrastructure. And workers in these communities would benefit from new "green collar" jobs that would be created in the process of building and maintaining the new clean infrastructure.

Here’s how it would work: Beginning in 2020, I-1631 would impose a first-in-the-nation pollution fee on the biggest polluters in Washington state that emit large amounts carbon dioxide into the atmosphere or that import carbon-laden fossil fuels. The fee would initially be set at $15 per ton of carbon dioxide and would increase annually at a rate of $2 per ton, adjusted for inflation, until the state meets specific air pollution reduction goals. It would generate roughly $1.4 billion in new resources for community investments in the upcoming 2019-21 budget cycle and more than $2 billion in the following 2021-23 cycle. (1)  

But the truly remarkable feature of I-1631 is the amount of revenue that would be directly invested into "pollution and health action areas," or areas that have been disproportionately impacted by air pollution. That includes many rural areas. It also includes places with large concentrations of people of color who, due to systemic racism, are much more likely to live in heavily polluted areas and areas with fewer employment opportunities.  

For example, in the 2019-21 budget cycle, the measure would require:

  • Substantial clean energy infrastructure projects located directly within pollution and health action areas ($145 million)
  • Resources to help people with lower incomes upgrade to newer, energy-efficient appliances, transition to low-carbon fuels, weatherize their homes, install solar panels, and offset other costs associated with transitioning to a low-carbon economy ($152 million)
  • Sovereign Indian Tribes receive a just share of resources to help address climate-related dislocation, fight poor health associated with disproportionate exposure to air pollution, build low-carbon energy and transportation infrastructure, and more ($146 million)
  • Assistance for workers employed in the fossil fuel industry to transition to good, clean-energy jobs. Workers near retirement would be eligible to receive wage replacements, health benefits, pension contributions, and other benefits. Younger workers would also be eligible for wage replacement, health benefits, and pension contributions. They would also be granted free access to retraining programs at state technical and community colleges, assistance with relocation costs, and priority placement at jobs in the clean energy sector ($50 million)
  • Resources to help people living in pollution and health action areas participate in the process of developing and monitoring clean energy projects and programs to help their communities transition to a vibrant clean energy economy ($15 million)

The remaining two-thirds of revenue from the pollution fee would be used to fund clean air and energy projects located outside of these targeted areas, and to sustain clean water and healthy forests throughout the state.

It's important to note that residents from pollution and health action areas would have a direct and strong voice in developing, approving, and overseeing projects funded by the pollution fee. That's because the measure would establish a public oversight board of representatives from Tribal governments, labor unions, and people living in pollution and health action areas, alongside agencies and experts in pollution reduction and clean energy. 

I-1631 would also create an environmental and economic justice panel composed of residents from pollution and health action areas, members of Tribal Nations, labor unions, and experts in clean energy and economic dislocation. The panel would be charged with developing and recommending projects to be located directly within the pollution and health action areas. It would also be responsible for developing programs to ensure people with lower incomes have the support they need to adapt and thrive in a low-carbon economy. 

Voters should approve I-1631 on the November ballot. The measure would help jumpstart Washington’s transition to a healthier, low-carbon economy in which all communities will have opportunities to thrive in the coming years. It is also the most inclusive effort ever undertaken to improve the health and well-being of communities in every corner of Washington state. 

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1. Washington State Budget & Policy Center estimate based on state carbon dioxide emissions data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration from 2015. Carbon emissions since 2015 were assumed to grow at an annual rate of 2.35 percent, the average annual rate of emission growth from 2012-2015. It is assumed that 10 percent of carbon dioxide emissions would not be covered by the fee due to noncompliance or exclusion. Twenty percent of revenues were assumed to be lost due to credits for emitters, exemptions for Energy Intensive Trade Exposed industries, exemptions for marine and aircraft fuels, and other exemptions included in the measure. This estimate will be updated once the state Office of Financial Management publishes an official estimate in the coming weeks.

Brief: Set kids up for success from early learning through higher education

Posted by Julie Watts at Jul 10, 2018 05:10 PM |

In recent years, Washington state has made important strides in investing in public education and early learning. In the coming years, these changes will be put to a crucial test: Will they help children, especially children of color, surmount the barriers to quality K-12 learning and lifelong achievement?

For KIDS COUNT in Washington’s new “Ensuring All Kids Have an Opportunity to Succeed” brief (a part of the State of Washington Kids 2018 series), we asked local education leader Matt Charlton, superintendent of Manson School District, “What would it take to make sure all kids have a path to success in life?” 

Thanks to local voter levies and to the state’s Early Childhood Education Assistance Program (ECEAP), which provides high-quality preschool to kids with very low incomes, the Manson School District offers free preschool to every four-year-old residing within its boundaries. Charlton said his district looked at the data to make this decision. And he said that quality pre-kindergarten was the single best investment the school district could make “in terms of readying children for kindergarten and overcoming language and poverty barriers.”

All kids should get off to a strong start in school. Yet in Washington, kids of color face the greatest barriers to kindergarten readiness. Far too many families cannot afford high quality early learning, especially programs that have a track record in addressing racial disparities.

Click on image to enlarge.

Many kids of color face the greatest barriers to a strong start in school

Fortunately, our state has powerful tools for removing barriers to kindergarten readiness through ECEAP and robust quality standards in child care. Recent analysis by KIDS COUNT in Washington found that additional investments in ECEAP to serve more kids would dramatically reduce disparities in kindergarten readiness for kids of color.

Kids also need to be able to stay strong through elementary and middle school and finish strong through graduation and post-secondary enrollment. Yet, kids of color face the greatest barriers to success there, too. 

Racial disparities persist in our education system because of systemic racism, including factors like inequitable funding between low-income and high-income schools, housing instability and racially disproportionate disciplinary practices. 

For example, an extensive body of research shows that systemic barriers like living in poverty and having low socioeconomic status are leading predictors of whether or not kids graduate on time. Kids of color face the greatest barriers to on-time graduation. American Indian, Pacific Islander, Black, Latinx, and mixed race students are two to three times more likely to live in poverty in Washington state than their white and Asian counterparts.

More public investments are needed to address these kinds of disparities. While recent investments in public education and early learning are an important step, more needs to be done to address racial disparities in education and to ensure all kids, especially kids of color, have a path to success in school and life. State lawmakers, parents, educators and administrators should consider supporting the following steps to boost success of children in school and in life: 

  • Expand the reach and flexibility of the Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program and invest in affordable access to quality child care, including investing in family, friend, and neighbor care.
  • Expand the state need grant, which provides tuition assistance to all students with a household income below 70 percent of state median income, so all income-eligible students have an affordable path to a degree or certificate. 
  • Invest in local communities and school districts that are designing programs and policy solutions that remove barriers for students of color to thrive in school, including investing in school board trainings on race and racial equity, ensuring parents of color are included in the hiring of leadership staff and principal leaders, and taking other important steps to create accountability and make progress toward more equitable outcomes for students of color.

Ensuring All Kids Have the Opportunity to Succeed” is the third release in the State of Washington’s Kids 2018 series.

KCinWA

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Brief: Child savings accounts advance economic opportunities for kids and families

Posted by Jennifer Tran at Jul 02, 2018 10:10 AM |
By Hana Jang, 2017-18 Narver policy fellow, and Jennifer Tran, senior policy analyst


In an inclusive economy, everyone – including the youngest among us – would have the means to have a lifetime of economic security. Yet this is not the case for many children and families in Washington state. Financial security and stability remain out of reach for many families, especially for families of color. Thirty percent of all households and 50 percent of households headed by people of color do not have enough savings to cover basic expenses for three months in the case of a sudden job loss, medical emergency, or another financial crisis – let alone enough resources to save for their own future and the future of their kids.

Our new brief, “Building Assets for Washington State’s Future” (the second in the Progress in Washington series), focuses on the need to create a statewide child savings account (CSA) program. CSAs are long-term savings accounts established for children early on in life that build until they reach adulthood, and offer incentives that can help accumulate savings along the way. By creating such a program, policymakers have the opportunity to give kids the opportunity for lifelong prosperity. CSA programs structured to advance equity can set kids up for lifelong economic success, particularly for kids of color in families who may face additional barriers to economic opportunity.

CSA

Whether they are set up at birth, kindergarten, or middle school, CSAs can have a big impact on a child’s life. Research shows that low- and moderate-income children with college savings are significantly more likely to go to college and graduate than those with no college savings. But the benefits of CSAs are not just limited to children’s post-secondary education opportunities. These accounts demonstrate the potential for parents and caregivers, together with children, to create a shared culture around savings. 

Washington’s elected leaders can give kids a strong financial foundation by developing a statewide CSA program. There are certainly logistics to work out to determine how best to establish a CSA program that reaches the needs of every child, but now is the time for big thinkers to come together and strategize about what that could look like in our state.

Our brief highlights the key elements of a CSA program that can advance equity and help build an inclusive economy for Washington state. Features that remove barriers to participation and encourage families to save – such as automatically enrolling every child, providing an initial deposit to kick start savings, and including additional incentives for children from families with low- and moderate-incomes – can help ensure all children from Washington state have the tools for lifelong financial security and stability.

Our state’s well-being is tied to the health and prosperity of kids and families. Policymakers who pursue the creation of CSAs can help our state thrive into the future and invest in our shared economic prosperity.

Building Assets for Washington State’s Future” is the second publication in our Progress in Washington 2018  series (see the first publication, “Building an Inclusive Economy,” here). This series examines ways our state can reach the goal of an inclusive Washington state economy with shared prosperity for everyone.


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KIDS COUNT: Inaccurate census data could jeopardize progress for Washington’s kids

Posted by Melinda Young-Flynn at Jun 27, 2018 09:50 AM |
 
Nearly 1 in 6 Washington children under age 5 live in neighborhoods where there’s a high risk that the U.S. census will fail to count them accurately, says a new report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation. An inaccurate 2020 census will erode essential public services for children in Washington and across the country, according to the 2018 KIDS COUNT Data Book released today.


Funding for essential health care, early education and K-12 learning, and other basic services depend on an accurate count of our communities. In Washington state, more than $3 billion in federal dollars are allocated yearly to Medicaid, food assistance, Head Start and other programs that help families meet basic needs. 

KIDS COUNT 2018 Data Book

Low-income children, children of color and children living in immigrant households are at greatest risk of being undercounted. The census may also miss children growing up in rural areas, tribal lands or in urban neighborhoods where census workers may have a hard time reaching households.

Further, the Trump administration’s proposed addition of an unnecessary question about citizenship will discourage countless others from filling out the 2020 census form. People without documentation and their families will be afraid that participation will result in having their lives, their families or their communities torn apart by Immigration and Customs Enforcement. 

“To give kids the full and equal opportunities to grow and thrive so they can be counted on in the future, we need to count them now,” said Paola Maranan, executive director of the Children’s Alliance. “Without robust efforts to get an accurate 2020 census, we place our shared future in jeopardy.”

In Washington state, an estimated 67,000 of the state’s 447,000 children under age 5 live in census tracts where households responded poorly by mail to the 2010 census—and may do so again in 2020. 

The Data Book notes that the threat of greater inaccuracies in the census coincides with the child population passing a landmark: in 2020, most of the U.S. population aged 18 and under will be of color.

“Low-income children, children of color and kids living in immigrant families stand to be disproportionately undercounted, while also having the most to lose as vital programs are sapped of public investment,” said Misha Werschkul, executive director of the Washington State Budget & Policy Center.

The annual KIDS COUNT Data Book ranks each state across four domains of child well-being: health; education; economic well-being; and family and community.

Washington state, which ranked 15th among the 50 states overall, ranked in the top 5 for child health. The percentage of uninsured Washington children fell by half from 2010 to 2016, from 6 to 3 percent. This progress is partially due to state-level efforts to connect more children with affordable, preventive health care through Apple Health for Kids. Apple Health for Kids is supported by federal investments in Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program, with funding allocations that depend on population estimates derived from the census.

Our state has the greatest room for improvement in the education domain, where it ranks 26th. One in 5 students don’t graduate on time, and almost 60 percent of three- and four-year-olds are not enrolled in preschool.

KIDS COUNT in Washington recommends that two things about the flawed census be changed. First, federal officials need to allocate sufficient funds to support a more accurate census in which as many people as possible can be counted. Second, the census form should be true to the purpose of the count that was originally stipulated in the U.S. Constitution: to count all people who live within U.S. borders. Questions that ask about citizenship will undermine participation—and they are simply not required.

Read the full 2018 KIDS COUNT Data Book. And read the KIDS COUNT Washington state 2018 profile 

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Media Contacts: 

Melinda Young-Flynn, melinday(at)budgetandpolicy(dot)org, (206) 262-0973, x223
Adam Hyla E. Holdorf, adam(at)childrensalliance(dot)org, (206) 324-0340 ext. 18

About KIDS COUNT in Washington
KIDS COUNT in Washington is a partnership of the Children’s Alliance and the Washington State Budget & Policy Center, made possible by support from the Annie E. Casey Foundation. It pursues measurable improvements in child outcomes through equitable public policy measures. For more information, visit www.kidscountwa.org

About the Annie E. Casey Foundation
The Casey Foundation creates a brighter future for the nation’s children by developing solutions to strengthen families, build paths to economic opportunity and transform struggling communities into healthier places to live, work and grow. Visit datacenter.kidscount.org for the most recent national, state, and local data on child well-being from the Casey Foundation's KIDS COUNT Data Center. 

 

Brief: Washington state must ensure kids are on the path to a healthy life

Posted by Jennifer Tran at Apr 11, 2018 12:55 PM |
Filed under: Kids Count, Health Care, Equity

Washington state has made tremendous gains in recent years to make sure more kids and families have greater access to health insurance. In 2007, the Washington State Legislature passed the Cover All Kids law, creating affordable, comprehensive Apple Health for Kids coverage. Since then, the number of Washington children without health coverage has dropped to its lowest level on record. Yet despite reaching historically high rates of insurance coverage, racial gaps in health outcomes persist and must be addressed.

HealthyStartPhoto

For KIDS COUNT in Washington’s new “Getting All Kids Off to a Healthy Start” brief (a part of the State of Washington’s Kids 2018 series), we asked local health leader Michelle Sarju, “What would it take to make sure young kids have a healthy start?” She noted that it begins with the quality of care an expectant mother receives – because women with low incomes experience the worst features of our public systems, which includes our health care system. Mistreatment at the hands of medical providers is a disincentive to seek further care, says Sarju. “Who wants to show up to a doctor’s appointment to be treated poorly?”

Even when socioeconomic differences are erased, race still matters. Black women are three times as likely to die from pregnancy and childbirth-related causes as white women, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. “For African American and Native American women, midwifery and doula care are two of several evidence-based strategies for improving maternal-child health outcomes,” says Sarju. “If you have a well-trained and licensed provider, you have much better outcomes. Midwives and doulas are strategic resources.”

In Washington state, women of color have a greater likelihood of dying from pregnancy-related causes. And infants of color – particularly Black, American Indian, and Pacific Islander babies –experience higher rates of infant mortality and preterm births and are more likely to be born at a lower birthweight.

In order to make systemic improvements to address these poor outcomes, decision makers must thoroughly assess quality of care for women and families of color. Policymakers, community health leaders, health care practitioners, and other individuals who influence health care and public health systems should also take other necessary steps to implement the following recommendations to help improve health outcomes for mothers and young children:

  • Identify interventions to address the adverse effects of structural and institutional racism on health outcomes;
  • Promote culturally relevant forms of health care, such as midwifery; and
  • Prioritize socioeconomic supports that advance the well-being of families, including Apple Health coverage, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (food stamps), Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, two-generation approaches to parent-child support like home visiting, and the full implementation of the state’s new paid sick and family leave laws.

Getting All Kids Off to a Healthy Start” is the second release in the State of Washington’s Kids 2018 series. See the first in our series here.

KCinWA

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Kids of color are leading the way into a more racially diverse state

Posted by Jennifer Tran at Apr 11, 2018 12:55 PM |
Filed under: Kids Count, Equity

Our new KIDS COUNT in Washington demographic profile, “Kids are Leading the Way Toward a New Washington,” shows how kids of color are leading our state into a more racially diverse future. The profile – the first release in our State of Washington’s Kids 2018 series – focuses on how Washington state’s population is projected to become majority people of color around 2050, and youth are at the forefront of this trend.

Already, 43 percent of kids in our state are kids of color. And in eight of Washington’s 39 counties, the population of children is already majority kids of color. Latino, Pacific Islander, and mixed-race children are the fastest growing segments of our youth population.

SWK County Map

Kids of color in Washington state are diverse in ancestry, including Mexican, Chinese, Indian, Vietnamese, Filipino, Korean, Ethiopian, Somali, and more. Additionally, over a quarter of Washington’s kids are immigrant or reside with at least one immigrant parent.

As kids of color continue to represent a growing share of Washington’s population, our state needs to create the conditions that allow all our children — regardless of race or ethnicity, immigration status, ZIP code, family income, gender, and whether English is their first language — to thrive. And the State of Washington’s Kids 2018 series provides recommendations for how policymakers can make this a reality. The first issue brief in the series, “Getting All Kids Off to a Healthy Start,” makes recommendations for how lawmakers and community leaders can help Washington’s kids have equitable opportunities for good health.

And in the coming months, keep an eye out for the next State of Washington’s Kids issue briefs. They will look at how our state can ensure kids in Washington have their basic needs met and how our state can ensure all kids have the opportunity to succeed in school and in life.

SWK2018


KIDS COUNT in Washington is a partnership between the Children’s Alliance and the Washington State Budget & Policy Center, supported by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. The demographic profile, “Kids are Leading the Way Toward a New Washington,” is the first release in our State of Washington’s Kids 2018 series, providing a racial demographic overview of Washington’s youth population. This profile is available in a printed folder format. For a hard copy, please contact adam(at)childrensalliance(dot)org.

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State legislators should focus on advancing shared prosperity during 2018 legislative session

By Misha Werschkul, executive director

As legislators convene in Olympia for the start of the 60-day state legislative session, the Washington State Budget & Policy Center encourages them to approach every budget-related policy decision this year by answering one critical question: Does this policy help put our state on a path toward an inclusive economy that promotes shared prosperity and advances racial equity?

At the Budget & Policy Center, our 2017-19 legislative agenda aims to meet that goal. We know that in order to build prosperity and to advance equity in our state and our economy, policymakers must keep the well-being and economic security of all Washingtonians top of mind. 

We are pleased that a number of our policy priorities advanced during the 2017 legislative session. In particular, elected leaders rightly strengthened supports for families to meet basic needs, closed outdated tax breaks like the sales tax exemption for bottled water and a tax break that largely benefited oil refineries, and approved paid family and medical leave. This progress is thanks in no small part to the work of community organizations, advocacy groups and everyday Washingtonians from across the state. [See the links at the end of this post for more details about our policy priorities that advanced in the 2017 session.]

Now, in 2018, elected leaders must take additional steps to ensure our state budget delivers on the values of our great state. They can no longer leave undone the important task of cleaning up our upside-down tax code – in which the wealthiest people pay the least state and local taxes as a share of their incomes. Cleaning up the tax code will help ensure our state has the revenue to pay for investments in great schools and strong communities. The stakes are higher than ever given that the U.S. Congress has passed new tax breaks benefiting the wealthy and profitable corporations and hasn’t acted to reauthorize funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program.

When legislators convene in January, they should:

  • Ensure there is ample and equitable funding to raise the salaries of public K-12 teachers, as required by the state Supreme Court, in time for the 2018-19 school year.
  • Support strong investments in our communities and the well-being of Washingtonians into the future by: helping more kids get access to our successful state preschool program, the Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program, by expanding eligibility; passing “breakfast after the bell” legislation that supports student health and readiness through nutrition; increasing supports for people experiencing economic insecurity, homelessness, and behavioral health challenges; protecting health care funding provided by programs like the Affordable Care Act and Apple Health for Kids; and taking steps to correct the short-sighted fixes and accounting gimmicks from the 2017-19 biennial budget.
  • Enact long-term solutions to fix our upside-down tax code by: closing the tax break on capital gains; making the tax on sales of real estate more equitable by reducing the tax rates on the sale of lower-valued properties and increasing the rates applied to properties that sell for more than $1 million; and boosting the incomes of hardworking families through the Working Families Tax Rebate

As a result of the special election in November, the makeup of the legislature, the leadership in the Senate, and the people on the budget-writing committees are different than at the close of the last legislative session. This legislature has a fresh opportunity to set our state on a path toward prosperity and an inclusive economy through our state budget. 

See our Progress in Washington 2018 report, “Building an Inclusive Economy,” for more details on how our state is faring when it comes to building an inclusive economy. And read more about our policy priorities that advanced in the 2017 legislative session in the following schmudget blog posts:

 

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HIGHLIGHTS

Save the date!

Our Budget Matters 2018 policy conference will take place on November 13 at Seattle Center. john a. powell from the Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society is the keynote. Stay tuned for more details. 

Our policy priorities

Washington state should be a place where all our residents have strong communities, great schools, and the chance for a bright future. Our 2017-2019 Legislative Agenda outlines the priorities we are working to advance.

Testimonies in Olympia

Misha TVW
Watch our 2018 legislative session testimonies on TVW: