Schmudget Blog


Senate Republican Budget Proposal Puts Washington’s Economic Future on Shaky Ground

Posted by Melinda Young-Flynn at Mar 21, 2017 03:20 PM |

Statement from Misha Werschkul, executive director of the Washington State Budget & Policy Center:

The two-year spending plan proposed by Republican leaders in the Washington State Senate would put the economic security of our state on shaky ground for future generations. This budget would fracture the foundation of our state economy with unsustainable fiscal gimmicks as well as deep cuts now – with even deeper cuts into the future – to investments that benefit all Washingtonians. And it ignores the real problem facing our state: an upside-down tax code that disproportionately and unsustainably relies on the people with the lowest incomes to pay the highest share of their incomes in state and local taxes – while special interests and the wealthy get tax breaks. 

It is the responsibility of policymakers to ensure the budget invests in the protection of our state’s current and future well-being – especially during this time when we face so many threats from the federal level. This proposal doesn’t do that. Instead, it would turn our state’s budget into a house of cards, precariously held together by fiscal gimmicks. For example, it would: 

Drain $700 million from our state’s budget stabilization account (or rainy day fund), which will be needed the next time we enter an economic downturn, in order to make a one-time contribution to a chronically underfunded pension fund. 

Mask deep cuts that legislators would need make in the future to public safety, environmental protection, and a host of other investments, by dedicating all future revenue growth to K-12 education and property tax reductions.

And if enacted, this plan would make devastating changes to some of our state’s most crucial investments. It would:

Eliminate or dramatically cut programs that help keep working families and individuals out of poverty, in stable housing, and with access to safe and reliable child care. 

Do away with the voter-approved initiatives to reduce class sizes and to provide teachers with pay increases to keep up with the rising cost of living. 

That’s not a prescription for economic growth and broad prosperity.

It doesn’t have to be this way. To truly invest in the foundations that make our communities thrive, lawmakers can turn our tax code right-side up and invest in schools and other priorities by closing wasteful tax breaks, including a huge break on capital gains enjoyed by the very wealthiest households in our state. Doing so would build a better future for our communities. Senate Republican leaders would be wise to rework this budget to ensure that it strengthens the economic foundations of our communities and advances the well-being of all Washingtonians.

Five Ways Trump’s Budget Proposal Would Harm Washington State

By Julie Watts, deputy director
 
The Trump administration’s federal budget proposal hurts the very people the administration purported to help and leaves our states on the hook to make up the difference. The budget calls for big increases in military spending and pays for it through deep cuts to programs that help strengthen the economic security of everyday Americans. These cuts are on top of those already being proposed to health care through the repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

 

President Trump has promised to be a champion of people left behind by the economy. However, his budget takes aim at the very programs that serve them. In fact, all of the cuts come from the Non-Defense Discretionary spending area of the federal budget. This part of the budget funds key priorities like job training, education, affordable housing, and basic supports for children, families, and the aging. It also includes funding for border security, veterans' benefits, and the FBI, but since Congress is unlikely to cut these areas, programs that help workers and families would be particularly hard hit. 

Trump’s budget proposal, entitled “America First: A Budget Blueprint for Making America Great Again,” would not, in fact, help the communities in our nation and in our state thrive. Here are five ways Trump’s budget proposals would hurt Washington state and its residents:

1. Shifting costs to our state government and making it harder to balance the state budget: Federal grants make up almost one third of the Washington state budget. (See chart below.) They pay for things like education, human services, the environment, and statewide emergency response. The budget proposal would cut federal grants to states, which would leave our state on the hook for $458.6 million per biennium to maintain these services. (That is not even taking into consideration the $2.5 billion our state would have to cover if the proposed repeal of the Affordable Care Act and cuts to Medicaid go through). 

Federal grants to WA pie chart_2017

2. Making it harder for people to make ends meet: President Trump’s proposed budget would eliminate the Low Income Energy Assistance Program, which helps people who don’t have enough money to pay their light and energy bills to keep the lights and heat/cooling on. This program – which largely serves people with low incomes and the elderly – would provide $113 million to the state in the 2017-2019 biennium. Trump’s budget would also eliminate the Weatherization Assistance Program, which provides roughly $8.6 million per biennium to the state to help people with lower incomes weatherize their homes to save on energy bills.

3. Making it harder for parents to care for their kids: Many working families rely on before- and after-school programs to not only provide educational and enrichment opportunities for their kids, but also to ensure that kids are well-cared for while they work. Trump’s budget proposal would eliminate the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program. This program would provide $36.1 million for before- and after-school programs in Washington state in the next biennium. Eliminating the program could mean nearly 18,000 state children would lose educational, recreational, and enrichment programs outside school hours.

4. Making it harder to get a living-wage job: Whether you are a young person just starting out or you’ve been laid off and are back in the market, job-seeking is a daunting task. The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) provides support to help eligible job seekers get education, training, and support services to succeed in the job market. WIOA grants to Washington totaled $137.5 million between 2015 and 2016. The Trump budget proposes cutting WIOA grants to states by 35 percent, which would mean the state would either need to come up with an additional $48.1 million in funds to cover the federal losses or serve 59,000 fewer people with job search and training support in the next biennium. 

5. Making it harder to get affordable housing: Washington state is in the midst of a homelessness crisis. Homelessness increased 15 percent in 2015 and again by 7 percent in 2016. The Trump budget slates the HOME Investment Partnerships Program,  a federal grant program to states to build affordable housing, for elimination. This program provides Washington state with about $38.1 million per biennium to issue to developers to build affordable housing units. Washington also stands to lose funding for Housing Choice Vouchers. These vouchers are an important tool in combating homelessness and providing people with low incomes with assistance to get housing in the rental market. In 2015, more than 50,000 Washington families had a roof over their heads thanks to this important program. Trump proposes to fund the vouchers at $1.7 billion below the amount necessary to maintain the current number of vouchers nationwide. That could mean big cuts to the number of households getting rental assistance in Washington.

And this is barely scratching the surface in terms of the cuts that the Trump budget is proposing.

President Trump’s budget proposal may have a difficult time clearing Congress. However, it represents a stark vision of what it would look like if Congress chooses to pursue a budget along similar lines: dramatic increases in military spending paid for with deep cuts to services and programs that help states support families, individuals, and workers. And again, this whole budget proposal is in addition to the dramatic cuts Washington state could be facing with the potential loss of ACA and Medicaid. 

 

Tax Reform Can’t Wait, New Revenue Forecast Shows

Posted by Kelli Smith at Mar 16, 2017 03:30 PM |
Filed under: State Budget, State Revenue
By Andy Nicholas, associate director of fiscal policy, and Kelli Smith, policy analyst 
 

All too often, certain lawmakers in Washington state who are ideologically opposed to creating a more just and sustainable tax system have leaned on positive revenue growth predictions to justify avoiding their obligation to fund schools and other investments that benefit all Washingtonians. Today’s projected uptick in future state tax resources is negligible compared to what we actually need to build thriving communities in every corner of our state in the years ahead. These projections should not be an excuse for these lawmakers to continue kicking their responsibility to fully fund schools down the road.

State tax revenues are now projected to come in $313 million higher than previously anticipated in the coming 2017-2019 budget cycle, according to the latest forecast from the state Economic and Revenue Forecast Council. But going beyond the headline, a deeper analysis shows that, without action to fix Washington’s flawed, inequitable tax code – by taking important steps that include ending the tax break on capital gains and reforming our property tax system – available resources will remain at untenable recessionary levels.

As the graph below shows, total state tax revenues actually declined by 15 percent between 2001 and 2016, after adjustment for economic growth. They dropped significantly during the last recession and have remained nearly flat since then. And revenues are projected to decline by an additional 7 percent from current levels by 2021.

(Click on graphic to see enlarged version.)

Revenue_Collections_2001_to_2016

Today’s small increase in projected tax collections for the coming years represents less than 1 percent of the amount of funding needed simply to maintain our existing commitments to early childhood education, clean air and water, public safety, and other priorities. The increase is insignificant relative to the billions of additional dollars in funding required by the state Supreme Court to ensure Washington’s kids get the high-quality schools they deserve.

It’s worth noting that these state revenue projections will also not offer any meaningful buffer against the extreme cuts to federal funding proposed by the Trump administration that would devastate many programs here in our state.  

The truth is that today’s forecast means lawmakers won’t have anywhere near the resources needed to help our state’s communities thrive for generations to come. Those resources can only be generated if lawmakers show the boldness of vision required to finally fix Washington state’s tax code.

Washington Should Invest in Thriving Communities Instead of Paying Out Special Interest Tax Breaks

By Andy Nicholas, associate director of fiscal policy, and Kelli Smith, policy analyst
 
To support the foundations that make ours one of the best states to call home, Washington state’s tax code should reflect who we are – a state known for innovation and a commitment to creating thriving communities for everyone. But right now, our state tax code misrepresents our values. It is riddled with nearly 700 tax breaks. And while not all of them are bad, many of them benefit only the most powerful and do little to strengthen our economy.
 

Wasteful tax breaks are depriving our communities of billions of dollars that are instead being funneled to large corporations and special interests that have manipulated the tax code in their favor. Those special interests are receiving money that our state could be collecting and investing in public priorities that benefit us all, like schools, utilities, and emergency services. 

To support the well-being of our state and its people, lawmakers must take long-overdue steps toward cleaning up our tax code so that it serves all Washingtonians and secures revenue to fund important state programs. They can do that by getting rid of budget-busting tax breaks. 

The Budget & Policy Center’s revenue reform plan, Accountable Washington, proposes closing or narrowing 21 of the most wasteful and outdated tax breaks in the code, which would inject $1.1 billion into our communities in the 2017-2019 biennium. They are detailed below.

Narrow the tax break for big oil extractors. Fuel used by manufacturers or extractors in the process of manufacturing or extracting at the same plant is exempt from the use tax. This tax break was originally enacted to benefit the timber industry, but today, it primarily benefits the oil industry. Curtailing this exemption would end the tax break for all fuel extractors, except on fuel from wood byproducts, also known as “hog fuel.”  

Repeal the sales tax break for nonresident shoppers. Residents of states where there is no or low sales tax – primarily Oregon, Alaska, Montana, and certain Canadian provinces – may make purchases in Washington without paying the sales tax. This exemption was originally enacted to make Washington’s border businesses competitive with neighboring states. However, the majority of exempt purchases from qualifying nonresidents occur in King County, which isn’t a border county. That suggests this break is wasted on tourists who would shop in Washington with or without it. 

Apply the sales tax to consumer services. Washington’s sales tax mostly applies to tangible retail goods, such as cars and appliances. It also applies to many “nondurable” goods such as toothpaste and other hygiene products. That worked pretty well back in the 1930s when consumers spent most of their incomes on these kinds of products. But, as the chart below shows, consumers today spend the majority of their income on services not covered by the sales tax. It makes sense to modernize our tax code to reflect this economic reality. Applying the sales tax to consumer services, such as spa treatments, financial advice, and cable and satellite TV packages would accomplish that. 

(Click on graphic to see enlarged version.)

 2017_03_14_consumption_chart

Close the sales tax break on bottled water. Our state’s sales tax applied to bottled water until 2008, when Washington joined a multi-state effort to conform to a single set of sales tax standards, which excluded bottled water. Since then, this exemption has left millions of dollars on the table each year. Not to mention the negative effects on the environment: Not only does packaging and transporting bottled water contribute to global warming, but empty plastic bottles are also notorious for filling landfills and clogging waterways. Policymakers can reapply the sales tax to most purchases of bottled water while ensuring it remains untaxed for people who don’t have access to potable water.

Close the sales tax break on candy and gum. Washington state has a broad-based sales tax. While there are valid sales tax exemptions for some consumer goods, including many grocery items, there is no compelling economic reason why candy, gum, and baked confections should have a tax exemption. Applying the sales tax to these items would generate significant new resources and make the sales tax more broad and sustainable in the long run. 

Eliminate a business tax break for large online retailers. Retailers that have employees and properties located in Washington state pay business & occupation (B&O) taxes on the goods they sell to Washingtonians. However, large online retailers with no employees or offices located in Washington don’t pay any B&O taxes – even though they sell millions of dollars in goods to customers located here. This loophole can be closed by adopting an “economic nexus” approach for the B&O tax. Under this rule, any business that makes at least one quarter of its total sales to customers in Washington state, or that has at least $267,000 in sales here, would be required to pay B&O taxes on their in-state activities. 

Narrow the tax break for trade-in vehicles valued over $10,000. Under current law, the full value of a vehicle trade-in to a dealership is exempted from the state sales tax. We propose limiting this exemption to the first $10,000 of trade-in value. The Citizen Commission for Performance of Tax Preferences notes that this tax break doesn’t stimulate enough additional sales to replace the lost sales tax revenue. Further, the average vehicle traded in at a dealership is valued at $7,500, which means many trade-ins would remain exempt under the proposed $10,000 threshold.  

Eliminate the preferential tax rate for prescription drug resellers. Businesses that warehouse and resell prescription drugs pay a B&O rate that is less than a third of the standard rate for wholesaling. Even though this preference was passed to lure prescription drug wholesalers to relocate to our state, the preference is now available to all drug resellers who do business here, including those operating out-of-state warehouses. This preference no longer serves any purpose except to provide giveaways to prescription drug companies. 

Close the public utility tax break for interstate trucking and rail hauls. Transportation businesses that begin or end their trip outside of Washington state are not taxed on any of their income generated from activities here. Repealing this exemption would subject such businesses to the public utility tax for income received while in the state. 

Eliminate B&O tax breaks that no longer serve us, including for industries such as international investment management services and banking facilities, travel arrangement services like those provided online, and soda sellers. These industries get a break on their B&O taxes even though there’s little evidence that they benefit state or local economies.

The full list of tax breaks we propose to narrow or close can be found in the table below. 

(Click on graphic to see enlarged version.)

Tax Breaks Table

When our state gives away money to big oil, international investment banking companies, and prescription drug resellers, it can’t use those dollars to invest in the things that benefit us all. It’s time for lawmakers to clean up these wasteful and outdated tax breaks and invest those resources into the things that provide the foundations for thriving communities – from schools to public health programs, and from parks to walkable sidewalks.

Working Families Tax Rebate Remains Smart Policy to Fix Our Tax Code, Bolster Washingtonians with Low Wages

Posted by Julie Watts at Mar 02, 2017 08:05 PM |
By Asha Bellduboset, Narver fellow, and Jennifer Tran, senior policy analyst
 
In Washington state, the Working Families Tax Rebate (WFTR) is a powerful tool to help rebalance the state’s tax code and strengthen the economic security of working families. WFTR is the state version of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), a federal tax rebate that lifts more families above the poverty line than almost any other government program. Through the EITC, qualifying low-wage workers can get an annual boost to their income in the form of a tax credit. Nearly all recipients are families with at least one child living at home. The WFTR was enacted by state policymakers in 2008 to build on the EITC and help hardworking Washingtonians meet basic needs. Unfortunately, the program has never been funded. It’s time for that to change.

Funding the WFTR is an important step lawmakers can take to clean up our inequitable tax code while reducing taxes for households with middle and low incomes. Under our current tax code, people with the lowest incomes pay seven times more in state and local taxes as a percentage of their income than the wealthiest 1 percent. The WFTR would help alleviate the disproportionate tax responsibility placed on people with low incomes by providing an extra boost to households already receiving the EITC.

Households that receive an EITC would get an additional 10 percent rebate for the year through the WFTR. For example, a family with two qualifying children receiving the maximum annual EITC credit amount of $5,616 could also qualify for an extra $562 through the WFTR. This extra income could cover the cost of feeding a family of three for one month or pay for a month of care for a school-age child.

Looking at the most current data on EITC filers, we estimate that if the WFTR were funded [1]:

  • Nearly 439,000 Washingtonians across every county who received an Earned Income Tax Credit would also receive a Working Families Tax Rebate, with a slightly higher share of benefits going to rural counties;
  • The WFTR would put $95 million back into the state economy; and
  • Qualifying households would on average receive approximately $2,400 in EITC and WFTR combined.

The EITC has been an extremely successful federal poverty-reduction tool, not only by immediately reducing taxes for working families, but also by supporting their work efforts through rebates that support access to transportation and child care. Our state should capitalize on the many established benefits of the federal program by fully funding the WFTR.

The map below further emphasizes why funding the WFTR is a smart policy choice. It would benefit households in all 39 counties in Washington state. And in particular, working families in rural counties in central and eastern Washington would see an economic boost.

Click on graphic to see enlarged version.

WFTR Map

Click here for a printable listing of total EITC returns and estimated WFTR rebate amounts for Washingtonians by county and legislative district.

And for details about the Budget & Policy Center’s full revenue reform plan, which includes the WFTR, visit our Accountable Washington webpage. The Accountable Washington plan would clean up the tax code, bolster the economic security of people with middle and low incomes, and invest in important statewide priorities

1. Budget and Policy Center’s Analysis of Brookings EITC 2014 Tax Year data, https://www.brookings.edu/interactives/earned-income-tax-credit-eitc-interactive-and-resources/

Our New Revenue Reform Plan Would Hold Lawmakers Accountable to Communities

By Andy Nicholas, associate director of fiscal policy, and Kelli Smith, policy analyst
 
Great schools, access to health care, safe communities, and other priorities are key to a strong economy and quality of life in our state. By investing in these priorities, lawmakers secure a brighter future for our state and its people.

But during the current legislative session, lawmakers are still struggling to find common ground on how to invest in schools and other key priorities. It’s essential that legislators take a bold, equitable path to fund our state’s most important investments and to bring greater balance to our tax code. The Budget & Policy Center has developed a plan that would do just that. This plan, called Accountable Washington, includes a package of reforms that would infuse $2 billion annually into our communities in the coming years, while significantly reducing taxes for Washington households with middle and low incomes. Additional details of the plan are available in this fact sheet.

As the chart below shows, taxes would decline by an average of 5.1 percent among the households with annual incomes that fall in the bottom fifth of Washingtonians. Households in the middle of the income scale would see their taxes decrease by 0.6 percent. By contrast, the richest 1 percent would see their taxes rise by 2.1 percent of annual income – a small price to pay for heightened investments in our communities. 

Click on the graphic below to see an enlarged version.

Accountable_WA_Distribution

Given the urgent need to fund state Supreme Court-mandated improvements to schools across the state, all of Washington’s children would be an important beneficiary of Accountable Washington. Further, this plan would ensure that lawmakers can fully funds schools while also keeping up investments in other programs that serve Washingtonians – such as responsive emergency services, clean water, food for kids who are hungry, and job supports for working parents. 

While looking to enact solutions to ensure we have adequate state investments, lawmakers should also be mindful not to raise new revenue on the backs of low- and middle-income households. These households already pay up to seven times more in state and local taxes as a share of their incomes than people at the top of the income scale. 

Accountable Washington would begin to clean up and rebalance our inequitable tax code in a way that raises billions of dollars in much-needed new resources. Here’s what it would do:

  • Enact smart, equitable reforms to the property tax, including eliminating an indiscriminate restriction on property tax revenue and offering in its place a new, targeted property tax rebate, which we call the safeguard rebate, for families earning $75,000 or less. Property taxes are the most significant source of funding for schools, and both state and local property taxes are at the center of the school funding debate. Under Accountable Washington, lawmakers can make the property tax code more sustainable and more equitable by raising the state property tax rate by $1.54 per $1,000 of assessed value and enacting a safeguard rebate to offset these increases for households with low and middle incomes. 
  • Rebalance the tax code by enacting an excise tax on capital gains at a rate of 9.9 percent on profits from the sale of stocks, bonds, and other financial assets of more than $25,000 (or $50,000 for couples). Washington is giving away a $2.8 billion capital gains tax break to the wealthiest Washingtonians. While 41 other states have this common-sense tax, Washington gives the wealthy a break on huge profits they receive simply from moving their wealth around. Almost 90 percent of this capital gains tax would be collected from the richest 1 percent of Washingtonians. Gains from the sale of a primary home, retirement accounts, college savings plans, and other common investments would be excluded from the tax. 
  • Lift up working families by funding the Working Families Tax Rebate (WFTR). Based on the federal Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), this rebate is a smart fiscal policy to help struggling families make ends meet. The EITC is one of the most powerful federal anti-poverty tools on the books. Including the WFTR in the Accountable Washington proposal keeps taxes from taking too big a bite out of family budgets for the lowest-income Washingtonians. 
  • Clean out 21 wasteful tax breaks that divert money out of classrooms and into the hands of special interests. To be clear, not all of Washington’s 700 tax breaks are bad policy, but many are outdated and no longer serve their original purpose. And others are simply giveaways to the powerful interests that finagled them into the tax code in the first place. Everybody benefits from excellent schools, clean air and water, safe roads, and accessible health care, so everybody should pitch in and pay their share. 

Our lawmakers have an historic opportunity to make some long-awaited repairs to our broken tax code, not only to provide a world-class education for Washington’s 1.6 million kids, but also to serve their parents, their teachers, their neighbors, and their entire communities. We believe they can do that through Accountable Washington. 

Check out this fact sheet on the proposal for more details.

Policymakers Have Opportunities to Advance Family Well-Being this Session

Posted by Julie Watts at Feb 15, 2017 12:10 PM |

Intergenerational approaches to addressing poverty are grounded in the principle that children thrive when their parents have the ability to meet their basic needs and secure their economic future. This legislative session, policymakers have several opportunities to pass legislation that would help ensure that Washington families across generations can reach their full potential and thrive.

As we have previously writtenHouse Bill 1484 and Senate Bill 5440 would lay the foundation and establish a framework to reduce the number of people living below 200 percent of the federal poverty line ($32,040 a year for a family of two) by half by 2025. 

Policymakers can also take steps this session to strengthen public benefit programs to have an immediate impact on child and family well-being. For example, they should ensure that state agencies and community organizations have the data and information they need to create effective poverty-reduction strategies. Current data sources don’t tell us enough about who is going hungry and missing meals due to a lack of financial resources. That is why policymakers and anti-hunger advocates have introduced Senate Bill 5485 and House Bill 2014 to allow the state to get more-detailed hunger data by region, race, and ethnicity to better target resources throughout the state. 

To see a fact sheet on why our state needs better data on hunger, click on the graphic below. 

Food insecurity graphic


Further, policymakers should also support these five intergenerational poverty-reduction priorities this session to build a better foundation for the future of our state:

  • Early Childhood Education: In order to thrive, all young children must have access to high-quality early learning. Policymakers must make sure more kids can enroll in the Early Childhood Education Assistance Program (ECEAP) and make sure the ECEAP child care centers have the resources to provide preschool education, and health and nutrition services. They should also improve both quality and access to affordable child care through Working Connections Child Care by eliminating potential waitlists, increasing the wages of child care workers, and ensuring providers have the resources they need to provide great care.
  • Post-Secondary and Employment Pathways: Education is a key pathway out of poverty. However, parents who participate in WorkFirst (a temporary assistance program to help families in poverty get on their feet) are not allowed to pursue more than 12 months of post-secondary education and training. A recent state study found that WorkFirst parents who manage against the odds to complete at least 54 credits (which takes at least 24 months) earned $6,252 more annually two years later and spent fewer total months on public assistance than parents who don’t go to community college. Senate Bill 5347 and House Bill1566 would allow WorkFirst parents to pursue 24 months of post-secondary vocational education and training.
  • Economic Assets:  We all need to have some savings to weather tough economic times, like the loss of a job or an illness. Unfortunately, some public assistance programs force people to spend down their savings or sell their car in order to qualify. As a result, people who are financially struggling need to dig themselves into a deeper economic hole before getting help. Two bills this session, Senate Bill 5609 and House Bill 1831 would raise or eliminate entirely asset caps in public assistance programs. Both bills would not only help people be more financially resilient, but would also make the programs more beneficial and cost-effective.

To see a fact sheet on the benefits of eliminating asset caps, click on the graphic below. 

Asset building image
  • Health & Well-Being: Research shows that children who grow up in economic hardship are at greater risk of experiencing toxic stress. In fact, as many as one in five low-income children and youth between ages 6 and 17 have some form of behavioral or mental health disorder. Rates are even higher for children who live in poverty and for those who become involved in the child welfare and juvenile justice systems. Intergenerational approaches to poverty place an emphases on reducing toxic stress through improved mental health services. House Bill 1713 and Senate Bill 5763 would require the state to better coordinate mental health resources and treatment for Medicaid-eligible children in Washington, require depression screenings for youth, and maintain a network of mental health providers.
  • Social Capital: Research has shown that there is an inter-relationship between social capital (relationships that help people earn more money and build influence in their community) and post-secondary education. Having social capital helps you get a better education and vice versa. Social capital and post-secondary education help people who’ve been incarcerated have a better transition home upon release, and they also them better contribute to their communities. Senate Bill 5069 and House Bill 1129 would allow people to pursue an associate’s degree while incarcerated, ensuring they have a chance at a better life when they are released and able to strengthen the well-being of their families and communities.


Policymakers on both sides of the political aisle have demonstrated their interest in and support for taking intergenerational approach to reducing poverty. The bipartisan support of many of these bills is a great sign that lawmakers want to support common goals to strengthen the well-being of all Washingtonians. 

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HIGHLIGHTS

Our Policy Priorities

Washington state should be a place where all our residents have strong communities, great schools, and the chance for a bright future. Our 2017-2019 Legislative Agenda outlines the priorities we are working to advance to build a better Washington.

Budget Beat!

Check out the Budget Beat webinars we hosted throughout the 2017 legislative session, including our most recent Budget Beat about federal budget proposals, featuring Louisa Warren of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, on our YouTube channel

Testimonies in Olympia

To advance our legislative priorities, the Budget & Policy Center team was in the state capitol throughout session testifying on a wide range of bills. Watch our testimonies on TVW:
Misha TVW