Schmudget Blog

House budget smartly proposes capital gains tax, but ignores Supreme Court’s order to fund schools this year

Posted by Melinda Young-Flynn at Feb 20, 2018 08:03 PM |

Statement from Executive Director Misha Werschkul

In their just-released budget proposal, House Democratic leaders revealed a plan that would improve equity in our state tax code by closing the capital gains tax break enjoyed by 2 percent of the wealthiest Washingtonians. We applaud the House’s move toward a more balanced tax code, but there are some drawbacks to the plan – including putting off funding teacher salaries another year and drawing from the state’s rainy day fund – which could threaten the long-term well-being of our communities.

Expanding on a similar proposal from their counterparts in the Senate, House leadership proposes a nearly $1 billion withdrawal from the state’s rainy day fund to provide property tax cuts across the state for the next two years. As we noted in our response to the Senate’s plan, this is a short-sighted use of the state’s emergency savings, which are meant to help keep schools, hospitals, and other critical services running when the state experiences an economic downturn. The rainy day fund should not be used to pay for tax cuts – especially during these good economic times.

Moreover, while closing the tax break on capital gains is a significant step toward rebalancing our upside-down tax code – in which low- and middle-income Washingtonians pay up to seven times more in taxes as a share of income than the top 1 percent – dedicating that revenue to across-the-board property taxes is a missed opportunity to generate additional revenue to strengthen our communities. Higher-income households do not need more tax breaks. 

Instead, lawmakers should focus on investments that lift up Washingtonians with low and middle incomes who already pay more than their fair share of taxes to support the community investments that serve us all. They should also prioritize meeting the state Supreme Court’s deadline to provide critical support for teachers and students by the start of the 2018 school year. 

Lawmakers in both chambers have an opportunity to set our state on a path toward a stronger and more equitable tax code to fund thriving communities. Closing the tax break on capital gains is an excellent start. 


Want to receive the latest news, updates, and analyses from the 
Washington State Budget & Policy Center in your inbox? Sign up here.


Document Actions

We’re hiring!

We currently have two opportunities available to join the Budget & Policy Center’s awesome team. Find out more about our policy analyst position and the Betty Jane Narver fellowship.

Join us for Budget Beat

Learn about the pros and cons of the final supplemental state budget. Sign up for our Budget Beat webinar, "Legislative Session 2018 Wrap-up," featuring our policy experts Kelli Smith, Andy Nicholas, and Julie Watts.

Friday, March 16, 12 – 12:30 p.m.

Sign up today

Our policy priorities

Washington state should be a place where all our residents have strong communities, great schools, and the chance for a bright future. Our 2017-2019 Legislative Agenda outlines the priorities we are working to advance to build a better Washington.

Testimonies in Olympia

Misha TVW
We're in Olympia throughout the 2018 legislative session to testify in support of bills that advance our legislative priorities. Watch our testimonies on TVW:

Our Seattle Policy Summit

You can watch our Budget Matters 2017 Seattle Policy Summit, which took place on December 6, online. The first part of the day (watch herefeatured Washington State Lt. Governor Cyrus Habib and Race Forward President Glenn Harris. The second part of the day (watch here) featured Budget & Policy Center Senior Policy Analyst Jennifer Tran, and a panel of local leaders moderated by Michael Brown of the Seattle Foundation.