Kids and parents deserve a stronger WorkFirst/Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program

Related Posts

Washingtonians call for bold action to support an inclusive economic recovery

Washington’s kids need investments – not short-sighted cuts – to weather the COVID-19 crisis

The 2020 census matters, and there’s still time to be counted

Washington needs targeted investment in Temporary Assistance for Needy Families

Federal leaders must keep money flowing to support equitable economic recovery

Kids and parents deserve a stronger WorkFirst/Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program

Lawmakers should reinvest in basic support for families experiencing poverty

By - February 13, 2020

WorkFirst, Washington state’s Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, provides essential support to families facing deep economic insecurity to meet their basic needs. It’s designed to protect kids and parents with very low incomes from the most harmful effects of poverty and support them to transition to long-term stability. Right now in Olympia, state lawmakers are considering important proposals to make critically needed reinvestments in WorkFirst/TANF that would help safeguard the health and well-being of some of the youngest Washingtonians and their caretakers – and legislators shouldn’t let them down.

Nearly three-quarters of those who receive WorkFirst/TANF assistance are children[1], which means that the program has a particularly important role to play in mitigating the impact of adverse childhood experiences (what researchers call ACEs) among kids in families with very low incomes in our state. ACEs include homelessness and housing instability, going without adequate food, and living with a parent experiencing a mental health crisis; they are often the result of, or exacerbated by, economic hardship. ACEs disrupt child development and can worsen kids’ health, educational, and economic outcomes into adulthood. WorkFirst/TANF should act as a stop-gap against these kinds of trauma, but state policymakers’ deep, repeated cuts to the program over the last decade have weakened its ability to reach families in need, leaving too many kids and parents across our state out in the cold.

We don’t mean that figuratively. Since 2015, more than a third of families removed from WorkFirst/TANF assistance due to punitive program cuts were homeless at the time they lost support.[2] In 2019 alone, this included more than 1,800 children.[3] Many families who are being cut off the program are also navigating significant health needs: about one third are facing a parent’s severe mental illness, and two in five are affected by substance use disorder.[4] Kids and parents who are already furthest from opportunity because of structural and institutional racism are being hit the hardest. Some WorkFirst/TANF program cuts (like strict and inflexible time limits) disproportionately harm Black and American Indian families who often face greater barriers to work and well-being.

State policymakers’ deep, repeated cuts to WorkFirst/TANF have weakened its ability to reach families in need, leaving too many kids and parents across our state out in the cold.

 

We don’t mean that figuratively.

House Bill 2441 and Senate Bill 6478 would reverse harmful WorkFirst/TANF policy choices – like stricter time limits and harsher penalties when families struggle to meet program requirements – that drive these and other negative outcomes. By taking steps to strengthen the program’s ability to help families meet their basic needs, the proposals offer important benefits for child well-being. A stronger and more equitable WorkFirst/TANF program would have the power to:

After a decade of dramatic caseload decline, the WorkFirst/TANF program reaches only 29 out of every 100 families living in poverty in our state – down from 50 out of every 100 families in 2008.[6] Only a fraction of kids and parents facing financial crisis can access even the most basic level of support to meet their survival needs.

It’s time for state lawmakers to change course, so that WorkFirst/TANF can actually function as a shield against the harmful effects of child and family poverty. Passing House Bill 2441 and Senate Bill 6478 would be a good start.

 

[1] Washington State Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS)

[2] Budget & Policy Center analysis of DSHS data on TANF recipients terminated for reaching the 60-month time limit and/or non-compliance sanction. Figure is the average of SFY 2015, 2016, 2017, and 2018 data.

[3] DSHS data on TANF recipients under 18 terminated for reaching the 60-month time limit and/or non-compliance sanction, SFY 2019.

[4] Budget & Policy Center analysis of DSHS data on TANF recipients terminated for reaching the 60-month time limit and/or non-compliance sanction. Figures are the average of SFY 2015, 2016, 2017, and 2018 data.

[5] See, for example: Thompson (2014), Duncan et al. (2014).

[6] Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

About Liz Olson, Senior Policy Analyst

Liz is on the research and policy team, where she focuses on basic needs, early learning, and related social policy. She joined our organization in this role following her two-year fellowship with us through the State Priorities Partnership – a national network of state fiscal policy organizations coordinated by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

Read more about Liz