Schmudget Blog
Yes on I-1631: An inclusive approach to building healthier communities

Yes on I-1631: An inclusive approach to building healthier communities

Posted by Andy Nicholas, 2018-07-18 17:25:00 | (0) Comments

Washingtonians must take bold action to confront the serious threat that air pollution poses to the health and well-being of communities from Longview to Walla Walla. But meaningful action can only be achieved and sustained if people and communities – especially people of color, rural communities, and other populations that are often overlooked by lawmakers and initiative campaigns – are rightfully included in developing solutions to this threat from the very beginning.

Brief: Set kids up for success from early learning through higher education

Brief: Set kids up for success from early learning through higher education

Posted by Julie Watts, 2018-07-10 17:10:00 | (0) Comments

In recent years, Washington state has made important strides in investing in public education and early learning. In the coming years, these changes will be put to a crucial test: Will they help children, especially children of color, surmount the barriers to quality K-12 learning and lifelong achievement?

Brief: Child savings accounts advance economic opportunities for kids and families

Brief: Child savings accounts advance economic opportunities for kids and families

Posted by Jennifer Tran, 2018-07-02 10:10:00 | (0) Comments
By Hana Jang, 2017-18 Narver policy fellow, and Jennifer Tran, senior policy analyst


In an inclusive economy, everyone – including the youngest among us – would have the means to have a lifetime of economic security. Yet this is not the case for many children and families in Washington state. Financial security and stability remain out of reach for many families, especially for families of color. Thirty percent of all households and 50 percent of households headed by people of color do not have enough savings to cover basic expenses for three months in the case of a sudden job loss, medical emergency, or another financial crisis – let alone enough resources to save for their own future and the future of their kids.

U.S. Supreme Court decision puts Washington’s economic well-being at risk

U.S. Supreme Court decision puts Washington’s economic well-being at risk

Posted by Melinda Young-Flynn, 2018-06-27 10:20:00 | (0) Comments
Statement from Washington State Budget & Policy Center Executive Director Misha Werschkul 
 
The U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Janus v. American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees will have a negative impact on all of us who rely on the critical public services that public sector employees deliver in communities across the state. And it will especially hurt the employees themselves – hundreds of thousands of firefighters, teachers, park rangers, nurses, and other public sector workers.


Since the 1970s, the U.S. economy has become increasingly out of balance, with gains in income concentrating among the very wealthiest, while low- and middle-wage workers have seen stagnating or declining incomes. In Washington state, the top 1 percent has an average income 22 times higher than the average income of the entire bottom 99 percent (see our "Building an Inclusive Economy" report for more details). A key driver of increased wage inequality is declining union membership, which has weakened the bargaining power of working households, especially in private sector jobs.   

KIDS COUNT: Inaccurate census data could jeopardize progress for Washington’s kids

KIDS COUNT: Inaccurate census data could jeopardize progress for Washington’s kids

Posted by Melinda Young-Flynn, 2018-06-27 09:50:00 | (0) Comments
 
Nearly 1 in 6 Washington children under age 5 live in neighborhoods where there’s a high risk that the U.S. census will fail to count them accurately, says a new report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation. An inaccurate 2020 census will erode essential public services for children in Washington and across the country, according to the 2018 KIDS COUNT Data Book released today.


Funding for essential health care, early education and K-12 learning, and other basic services depend on an accurate count of our communities. In Washington state, more than $3 billion in federal dollars are allocated yearly to Medicaid, food assistance, Head Start and other programs that help families meet basic needs. 

HIGHLIGHTS

Save the date!

Our Budget Matters 2018 policy conference will take place on November 13 at Seattle Center. john a. powell from the Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society is the keynote. Stay tuned for more details. 

Our policy priorities

Washington state should be a place where all our residents have strong communities, great schools, and the chance for a bright future. Our 2017-2019 Legislative Agenda outlines the priorities we are working to advance.

Testimonies in Olympia

Misha TVW
Watch our 2018 legislative session testimonies on TVW: