Top 10 Graphs About Capital Gains

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Top 10 Graphs About Capital Gains

By - February 29, 2012

Implementing a tax on capital gains, such as the one proposed in House Bill 2563, would be a bold way to promote job creation, long-term economic growth, and a prosperous future for all Washingtonians. Below is a ‘top ten’ list of graphs and tables highlighting why a tax on capital gains is a smart and effective way for Washington to strengthen its vital public health and education systems. (Click on graphs to enlarge.)

House Bill 2563 will be heard in the House Ways & Means committee this morning.

Drum roll please…

1.

 96 Percent of Capital Gains go to Millionaires

 See: “Capital Gains Still More Concentrated Among Wealthiest Few”

2.

Capital Gains Grow Much Faster than Retail Sales

 See: “Capital Gains: A Rapidly Growing, Yet Untapped Resource”

3.

Hedge Funds and Other Elite Partnerships

 See: “Elite Investment Clubs Account for Largest Share of Capital Gains”

4.

Taxpayer A vs Taxpayer B

 See: “A Capital Reform”

5.

DJIA vs Other Econ Indicators

 See: “Accelerate Washington’s Economy, Tax Capital Gains”

6.

Capital Gains Tax Would Help Build A Much Larger RDF

 

7.

 Distribution of Capital Gains Table

 See: “A Capital Reform”

8.

42 States Tax Capital Gains

 See: “A Capital Reform”

9.

Concentration Index

 See: “Capital Gains Becoming Even More Concentrated Among Richest Few”

10.

Investment vs Capital Gains Taxation

 See: “Taxing Capital Gains at Ordinary Rates” By Jared Bernstein

Bonus graph!

Capital Gains Stabilization

 See: “Capital Gains Tax + Rainy Day Fund = Greater Economic Stability”

About the author

Andy specializes in state budget and tax policy. Since joining the Budget & Policy Center in 2009, he has served on a Legislative Task Force on Tax Preference Reform and has conducted numerous analyses of Washington state’s tax code.

Read more about Andy